The finance committee sends the final draft to the council for budget decision on Wednesday


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The month-long review of departmental forecasts for 2022 ended on Tuesday with the approval of its budget by the finance and economic development committee before the final council vote.

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The committee oversees much of the administrative functions of Ottawa’s municipal government, such as human resources, legal services, and council member budgets. The committee is also responsible for the construction of the O-Train, Service Ottawa, government accessibility and economic development.

The committee budget is a mishmash of expense and income lines, as there are certain areas that do not have specific departments – like the Rideau Carleton Raceway games revenues – or they are global in nature, as the income line for all property taxes.

The city expects to collect about $ 1.9 billion in property taxes in 2022, an increase of about $ 87 million from 2021. The proposed three percent property tax increase is expected. bring in an additional $ 56 million, while new property assessments will add to the tax. roll would bring in $ 31 million.

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It was the last chance for the public to comment on the 2022 budget proposal before the document went to council on Wednesday.

The committee heard from small business owner Liz Mok who urged the city to pursue “phased strategies” in the budget, such as providing more help to homeless people and providing the public with more toilets. She called for more free public transport and a city center more accessible on foot.

Mok also warned council members that “buy local” campaigns, like those supported by the city, do not go far.

“I really believe the citizens of Ottawa want to support their local businesses, but they don’t have the extra income to do it,” Mok said.

Other delegates from the public drew the committee’s attention to the climate emergency declared by city council and called for more action through the city budget.

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Phillip Turcotte, chair of the city’s accessibility advisory committee, encouraged the city to continue allowing the public to participate in committee meetings remotely, a feature that was created out of necessity due to the COVID-pandemic. 19.

“Virtual participation is not only possible, but it also creates more opportunities for engagement,” said Turcotte.

The committee also learned that the chairman, Mayor Jim Watson, is calling a special meeting on December 17 to hear updates on the construction of the O-Train and legal issues. An update on the Trillium Line project previously scheduled for Tuesday’s finance meeting was postponed to the special meeting on December 17.

jwilling@postmedia.com

twitter.com/JonathanWilling

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