Home Rule – Ballinger TX http://ballingertx.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:05:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ballingertx.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Home Rule – Ballinger TX http://ballingertx.org/ 32 32 DeSantis ready to act on latest stack of bills https://ballingertx.org/desantis-ready-to-act-on-latest-stack-of-bills/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:05:51 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/desantis-ready-to-act-on-latest-stack-of-bills/ Gov. Ron DeSantis said Monday he expects to act quickly on the remaining bills from the 2022 regular legislative session. With the state’s new fiscal year set to begin July 1, DeSantis had 52 bills remaining on his desk of 280 that were approved by lawmakers in the regular session and two subsequent special sessions. […]]]>

Gov. Ron DeSantis said Monday he expects to act quickly on the remaining bills from the 2022 regular legislative session.

With the state’s new fiscal year set to begin July 1, DeSantis had 52 bills remaining on his desk of 280 that were approved by lawmakers in the regular session and two subsequent special sessions.

On Friday, the Legislative Assembly sent the final batch of bills to DeSantis. DeSantis can sign, veto, or allow bills to become law without his signature.

Asked Monday about one of the remaining bills, a controversial measure that would change alimony laws (SB 1796), DeSantis did not say whether he would approve of the proposal. He only said he planned to sign or veto all remaining measures, possibly this week.

“We follow our process. A lot of bills that are returned, you know, they get thrown on my desk and I have to look to see on each one, we do our due diligence,” DeSantis told Pig Bar-BQ in Callahan. . “We are studying them. We’re trying to make the best decisions we can, you know, for the people of the state of Florida. So this process is ongoing. I think we’ve paid probably 80 (percent) to 90 percent of the bills already.

Former Gov. Rick Scott has twice vetoed proposed child support revisions.

This year’s bill would make a series of changes, including revising the process for changing child support when people who have paid are looking to retire. Paying ex-spouses would have to give one year’s notice of their intention to retire and could stop payments upon retirement, except in certain circumstances.

The bill would also abolish permanent child support and set maximum payment terms. Spouses who have been married for less than three years would not be eligible for child support and those who have been married for 20 years or more would be eligible to receive payments for up to 75% of the length of the marriage.

Another part of the bill would require judges to start with a “presumption” that children should split their time equally between parents.

Critics have argued that parts of the proposal, such as pension changes, could impoverish ex-spouses who have been housewives and depend on child support payments.

But Marc Johnson, president of the Florida Family Fairness group, which supports the bill, issued a statement Friday saying it’s “time to modernize Florida’s family court laws, making the process fairer and predictable for all parties while reducing the cost of litigation.”

Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, declined to comment Monday on the child support bill. But she said DeSantis should veto a separate pending measure that could open the door for companies to sue cities and counties.

“It is important that local governments have the capacity to do what is right for their communities. Fried told reporters on Capitol Hill. “If people don’t like the legislation, the ordinances they pass, then they reject it. But for the state government to step in and overrule these decisions and create this opportunity for companies to sue is the most egregious overreach of autonomy I’ve seen.

Ahead of the bill’s passage in March, House sponsor Lawrence McClure, R-Dover, said it would cause local governments to “pause” before they enact ordinances that would harm businesses.

The bill (SB 620) would allow companies to sue cities and counties if the orders cause at least 15 percent lost profits. It would apply to businesses that have been in business for at least three years and allow them to sue for lost profits for seven years or the number of years the business has been in business, whichever is lower.

The regular legislative session ended in March, although legislators each year incrementally send bills to DeSantis for consideration.

Copyright 2022 News Service of Florida. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Cleaning: a laundry expert explains how to wash pillows and pillowcases https://ballingertx.org/cleaning-a-laundry-expert-explains-how-to-wash-pillows-and-pillowcases/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/cleaning-a-laundry-expert-explains-how-to-wash-pillows-and-pillowcases/ Pillows can often yellow and stain over time if not cleaned regularly. Pillows, pillowcases and bedding should be cleaned regularly to remove skin oils, sweat, dead skin cells, dust and allergens. For those who don’t know how to clean their pillows and pillowcases, bedding expert Malik Karman of Eachnight Mattresses shared his “rule of thumb” […]]]>

Pillows can often yellow and stain over time if not cleaned regularly. Pillows, pillowcases and bedding should be cleaned regularly to remove skin oils, sweat, dead skin cells, dust and allergens. For those who don’t know how to clean their pillows and pillowcases, bedding expert Malik Karman of Eachnight Mattresses shared his “rule of thumb” for washing pillows and pillowcases.

Malik said bedding should be washed “once a week,” including pillowcases.

However, the mattress expert said some people may benefit more from washing pillowcases more frequently.

Cleaning the pillowcases will remove skin oils and allergens that accumulate in the fabric.

Pillows don’t need to be cleaned “too often” if they are covered.

READ MORE: Are there ‘criminal plants’ in your garden? 9 plants you can’t grow

“Size is also important to consider.

“King size pillows usually need to be washed in an industrial washing machine, so you probably won’t be able to wash them at home.

“If your pillow can be washed at home, remove all protective coverings and place the pillow in the washing machine.

“If your washing machine has an agitator, it’s best to wash two pillows to better maintain balance. After the pillow has been washed with a mild detergent, dry it on low heat.

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Another ticking time bomb explodes in Park Slope – Streetsblog New York City https://ballingertx.org/another-ticking-time-bomb-explodes-in-park-slope-streetsblog-new-york-city/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 04:01:40 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/another-ticking-time-bomb-explodes-in-park-slope-streetsblog-new-york-city/ The injuries were minor. The indignation is heavy. A Park Slope pedestrian was recently hit and injured by the driver of a Honda – a car that had been slapped with nine camera-issued speeding tickets and three red light tickets in less than two years. Why the driver was even behind the wheel that day […]]]>

The injuries were minor. The indignation is heavy.

A Park Slope pedestrian was recently hit and injured by the driver of a Honda – a car that had been slapped with nine camera-issued speeding tickets and three red light tickets in less than two years.

Why the driver was even behind the wheel that day says a lot about why New York’s roads are so dangerous — even if the identities of the most reckless drivers are known to city officials. Prior to the June 9 crash, all but four of those $50 camera-issued tickets had been paid for, so the driver was free to continue driving.

“Our elected officials just don’t care that people are speeding, running red lights, blocking intersections and running into people,” said Kim Brettland, who witnessed the crash and posted the blatant driver’s record on Twitter. “There’s no way it’s flying in Germany or the Netherlands.”

It flies here because there’s no simple mechanism left to knock reckless drivers off the road repeatedly. Tickets issued by camera do not count towards a driver’s license. As long as the tickets are paid, the sheriff does not tow the cars of reckless drivers. And the city requires drivers with more than 15 speeding tickets or five red light violations per year to take a safe driving course. But only a fraction of the thousands of drivers who have reached that threshold have been ordered to take the course. (The chart below is 2021; use the filter to select this year, which is only six months old.)

Meanwhile, the state’s bill that extended speed camera operating hours to all day, every day originally included a provision to increase fines for repeat offenses, but leaders of the city ​​council hesitated and did not approve this provision as the bill was being drafted. negotiated in Albany.

“It was in the bill and I told the DOT I thought it was reasonable, but when we got to the end of [the legislative] session, I never saw that provision again,” said Assemblyman Bill Magnarelli (D-Syracuse). “The message about Council autonomy didn’t include it and that was the end of it.”

Other bills in Albany that would have counted speed camera or red-light tickets also died in Albany, also missing messages about the city council’s bylaws.

“It’s pretty clear that if your first ticket was $100, then the second was $500, then the third was $1,000, people wouldn’t speed up,” Brettland said.

In the June 9 crash at the corner of Union Street and Sixth Avenue, it’s unclear whether the driver was going too fast, although another witness said he ran a red light. The victim was struck by the front of the car, flew over the windshield and then thrown into the street, Brettland said. He wasn’t seriously hurt, but the next victim might not be so lucky.

“It’s like that 3-month-old baby who was killed in Fort Greene by the driver with 91 speeding tickets,” Brettland said. “Why was this driver on the road with a record like that? It is a government choice not to hold drivers accountable. That in itself is negligence. »

Brettland couldn’t help but think about the Honda driver’s next victim. “Maybe it will be me or my child,” she said. “It’s fucking infuriating that there are literally NO CONSEQUENCES to hitting people.”

The NYPD declined to say whether the driver of the June 9 crash has been charged. Council President Adrienne Adams declined to comment for this story.

Meanwhile, Magnarelli says he hopes the legislature can impose escalating fines in the next session.

“I believe in cameras,” he said. “If you break the law and get caught, you get fined. It is very good. Laws are there to be enforced.

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Canada and Denmark end decades-long dispute over Arctic waste rock | Arctic https://ballingertx.org/canada-and-denmark-end-decades-long-dispute-over-arctic-waste-rock-arctic/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:02:00 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/canada-and-denmark-end-decades-long-dispute-over-arctic-waste-rock-arctic/ It has been described by some as a “pseudo-confrontation”, by others as a diplomatic afterthought. Now, however, the so-called “Whiskey War,” which was never really a conflict, has finally been resolved with the formal division of a tiny, barren Arctic island between Canada and Denmark. Located in the Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait, between the […]]]>

It has been described by some as a “pseudo-confrontation”, by others as a diplomatic afterthought. Now, however, the so-called “Whiskey War,” which was never really a conflict, has finally been resolved with the formal division of a tiny, barren Arctic island between Canada and Denmark.

Located in the Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait, between the northwest coast of the semi-autonomous Danish territory of Greenland and Canada’s Ellesmere Island, the half-square-mile uninhabited Hans Island, n t has no mineral resources or much of interest unless you are a visiting seabird.

Shaped like a muffin and surrounded by cliffs, it was for centuries a hunting ground for the Inuit. Importantly, however, it has been at the center of a long-running border dispute between Canada and Denmark – via the Greenland Home Rule Government – Copenhagen claiming that geological evidence points to Hans Island being part of Greenland – a claim rejected by Ottawa.

Aerial view of Hans Island. Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images

Canada and Denmark agreed in 1973 to create a border through the Nares Strait, halfway between Greenland and Canada. But they could not agree on which country would have sovereignty over Hans Island, located about 1,100 km (680 miles) south of the North Pole. In the end, they decided to settle the ownership issue later.

This prompted largely good-natured advocacy between the two sides, including advertisements posted on Google promoting their demands and flag-raising stunts.

The reference to the ‘Whiskey War’ came after Denmark’s Greenland Affairs Minister hoisted a Danish flag on the island in 1984, buried a bottle of Danish schnapps at the base of the mast and left a note saying: ” Welcome to the Danish island”.

The Canadians then planted their own flag and left behind a bottle of Canadian brandy. Since then, countries have alternately hoisted their flags and left bottles of various spirits in tit-for-tat motions.

In 2002, Nana Flensburg was part of a Danish military crew who stood on the cliff to perform a flag-raising ceremony. The Politiken newspaper quoted her on Tuesday as saying in her diary that “among the stones in the cairns were many bottles, glasses, etc. with documents informing of previous visits to the island”.

At the height of the rivalry, both sides began buying Google ads to assert their rights after Denmark said it would send a letter of protest against a visit by the then Canadian defense minister , Bill Graham, in 2005.

Graham had declared that Canada had always owned the island, prompting Denmark to reply: “Hans Island is our island. Some Canadians have in turn proposed a boycott of Danish pastries in an echo of how some Americans rejected “fries” when France refused to join coalition forces in Iraq.

Now that the friction is over, the two countries agree to share the small island in a deal to be signed later on Tuesday.

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“This sends a clear signal that it is possible to resolve border disputes (…) in a pragmatic and peaceful way, where all parties win,” Danish Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod said. He said it was “an important signal now that there are a lot of wars and troubles in the world”.

The agreement enters into force after the completion of the internal procedures of the two countries. In Denmark, the parliament must first give its consent to the agreement.

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State Passes Home Rule Legislation for Ogdensburg Sales Tax Revenue | St. Lawrence County https://ballingertx.org/state-passes-home-rule-legislation-for-ogdensburg-sales-tax-revenue-st-lawrence-county/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 02:55:26 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/state-passes-home-rule-legislation-for-ogdensburg-sales-tax-revenue-st-lawrence-county/ OGDENSBURG — Home Rule legislation that would change the amount the city of Ogdensburg collects in sales tax has been passed by both the Senate and the State Assembly. The measure passed this weekend. The Ogdensburg City Council had passed several resolutions supporting the bill to codify an arrangement between St. Lawrence County and the […]]]>

OGDENSBURG — Home Rule legislation that would change the amount the city of Ogdensburg collects in sales tax has been passed by both the Senate and the State Assembly.

The measure passed this weekend. The Ogdensburg City Council had passed several resolutions supporting the bill to codify an arrangement between St. Lawrence County and the city regarding the equal sharing of the additional 1% sales tax collected in the city. City officials estimated this would increase sales tax revenue between $600,000 and $1.2 million.

“I am pleased that once again I have been able to respond to the City of Ogdensburg’s request to pass ‘home rule‘ legislation in the Senate regarding sales tax apportionment,” said Sen. Patricia A. Ritchie, R-Heuvelton, in a statement Thursday.

Assemblyman Mark C. Walczyk, R-Watertown, expressed similar sentiments.

“I am encouraged that the City of Ogdensburg and the County of St. Lawrence have worked together and found common ground on sales tax revenue sharing. We were happy to carry the bill and do it,” he said. “The only American city on the St. Lawrence is a special place, filled with great people and worth returning to. We can’t wait to see what happens next in the ‘borough.’

When reached for comment, Ogdensburg Mayor Jeffrey M. Skelly said he was glad the legislation passed but felt the city had lost an opportunity for additional revenue by not getting not the entire 1% of the county.

“Getting half of the last penny helps us, but I really think our city needed the whole penny. Having jurisdiction over the last penny gives us the opportunity to become perhaps the 7-cent sales tax community in Upstate New York,” Mayor Skelly said.

He said if the city was able to get the full 1%, it could develop payments in lieu of taxes or PILOT programs with developers and retailers to attract business to the city as well as giving residents what would essentially be a tax cut if they only had to pay 7% instead of 8% sales tax on their purchases.

While the city will take half of the 1%, Mr. Skelly said that if he had had more support from the city council, they might have been able to make it happen.

“Steve Jellie (City Manager) and I fought hard to get this, if there had been more of a united front we might have had all the money. The people who didn’t participate in the effort at all and then jumped on board with the half-penny killed that chance,” Mayor Skelly said.

St. Lawrence County Legislative Speaker William J. Sheridan, R-Hammond, did not return a call seeking comment.

County Legislator James E. Reagen, R-Ogdensburg, thanked Sen. Ritchie and Assemblyman Walczyk for their work in getting the legislation passed as well as City Council and county lawmakers who agreed to the compromise .

“This will provide the City of Ogdensburg with long-term security that it will not face future cuts to its sales tax revenue,” Reagen said.

Mr. Reagen expects that with the opening of the Canadian border, city officials will see higher-than-expected returns since the numbers were used for the previous two years when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. locked the border.

“Under this new arrangement, Ogdensburg will be able to keep all sales taxes collected within the city limits, and most of us who are familiar with Ogdensburg will realize that sales in Canada represent a large number of transactions that occur produce in many of our retail stores on a daily basis,” Mr. Reagen said. “Some people have questioned the compromise we’ve been able to achieve, but they haven’t really taken into account that all the estimates that have been discussed are based on the last two years where no Canadians have featured. in the equation. Now we will earn a lot of money. And now, as we work the shoreline and encourage more businesses to locate in Ogdensburg, our community will stand to benefit directly from this sales tax increase.

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Boris Johnson, sinking at home, has fans in Ukraine https://ballingertx.org/boris-johnson-sinking-at-home-has-fans-in-ukraine/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 06:17:18 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/boris-johnson-sinking-at-home-has-fans-in-ukraine/ Placeholder while loading article actions You are reading an excerpt from Today’s WorldView newsletter. Sign up to get the rest for freefeaturing news from around the world, interesting ideas and opinions to know, delivered to your inbox every day of the week. At home, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is a prime minister on borrowed […]]]>
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You are reading an excerpt from Today’s WorldView newsletter. Sign up to get the rest for freefeaturing news from around the world, interesting ideas and opinions to know, delivered to your inbox every day of the week.

At home, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is a prime minister on borrowed time. He survived an internal Conservative Party vote of no confidence on Monday, but his political obituaries are already being written. The ‘Partygate’ scandal – how he and his key allies defied the strict pandemic containment measures they themselves had imposed on the country – has rendered his former brand Teflon irretrievably toxic. Johnson’s march to power was driven by his distinct and puckish nationalism. But he could be forced from power by rival voters and politicians obsessed with his seemingly inescapable narcissism.

Johnson’s approval ratings have plummeted and show few signs of improving. A wing of his own ruling party is in open rebellion against him. There is no certainty that Johnson, like Theresa May, the prime minister he replaced, can recover from a deadly vote of no confidence to lead the Tories in the next UK general election. The British public have already delivered a damning verdict: last week, her appearance at Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations was met with a chorus of boos from the otherwise enthusiastic crowd.

“He’s a wounded leader,” my colleagues reported. “He and the Tories will struggle to rebuild their brand in the face of soaring inflation and declining public confidence. And allies in Europe and the United States are now on notice that his authority has been undermined by his own actions.

How Boris Johnson went from a landslide victory to a vote of no confidence

Yet there is one remarkable ally who remains unfazed by Johnson’s domestic woes.. On Tuesday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said on a conference call hosted by the Financial Times that he was “very happy” that Johnson had won the vote of no confidence, presenting him as a “true friend of Ukraine”.

“I’m glad we haven’t lost an important ally, that’s great news,” Zelensky said.

It wasn’t just polite rhetoric. Few Western leaders have tied themselves as closely to the Ukrainian cause as Johnson, who championed arms transfers to Ukraine early on and visited Kyiv in April, strolling through the Ukrainian capital with Zelensky. In May, he became the first foreign leader since the Russian invasion began to address the Ukrainian parliament.

“You have exploded the myth of [Russian President Vladimir] Putin’s invincibility and you have written one of the most glorious chapters in the military history and life of your country,” Johnson said via video address. “The so-called irresistible force of Putin’s war machine has shattered on the steadfast object of Ukrainian patriotism and love of country.”

Johnson, ever keen to invoke the spirit of Winston Churchill, described the brave Ukrainian resistance as the country’s “finest hour”, an “hour to be remembered and remembered for generations to come”.

Boris Johnson survives but is weakened by a vote of no confidence

During the war, Johnson established himself as Western Europe’s most vocal anti-Russian hawk. Freed from the obligations of European Union membership and his efforts to build political consensus within the continental bloc, Johnson has taken a more strident line in defending Ukraine’s interests. His stance has made him a frequent target of Russian state media, a geopolitical animosity he could welcome as his government struggles to shape Britain’s new “global” identity after Brexit.

On the day of the no-confidence vote, Johnson tweeted an image of himself at 10 Downing Street on the phone with Zelensky, along with a message offering “long term” support for Ukraine. After surviving the vote, Johnson’s office once again turned to Ukraine, issuing a statement following a cabinet meeting insisting it was “vital” that Zelensky not be ” forced to accept a bad peace deal” and that “the world must avoid any outcome where Putin’s unwarranted aggression seems to have paid off.

It is a tacit response to other prominent voices, both in the West and outside, calling for dialogue between Kyiv and Moscow to end the war quickly and stabilize a massively troubled global economy.

Johnson’s enthusiasm has not gone unnoticed in Ukraine. A town near the port city of Odessa is said to have named a street after the British prime minister. A candle bakery in Kyiv even concocted a special pastry in his honor – an apple and cinnamon cake decorated with a layer of frilly meringue on top, as a tribute to Johnson’s constantly neglected mop of hair.

“Boris Johnson is not only a prime minister but is also now a crescent,” the establishment announced on his Instagram account, according to the Telegraph.

Few in Britain find Johnson so nice. The prime minister has been criticized, as Adam Taylor of Today’s Worldview noted a few months ago, for his history of ties to Russian oligarchs, ties that stretch across much of the conservative political firmament. As mayor of London, he presided over a status quo that saw a network of shadowy foreign elites park their capital in the British capital. The war prompted, critics say, a very belated government response to the infiltration of illicit wealth into the country’s economy.

Moreover, for all his loud applause for Ukraine’s war effort, Johnson and his government have taken in far fewer Ukrainian refugees than other European partners. In May, Johnson was forced to point out that asylum seekers from Ukraine would not be shipped to Rwanda, the African nation 4,000 miles away where Britain is now determined to send its asylum seekers.

Even before Russia launched its invasion, analysts spied Johnson’s embrace of Ukraine, a desperate attempt to summon the legacy of Margaret Thatcher’s Falklands War. Thatcher faced mounting inflation and mounting domestic anger over her program, but the victorious conflict against Argentina in 1982 helped her win re-election and set in motion a decade of national overhaul.

“It was a minor post-colonial conflict, but the victory in the Atlantic helped to cement her reputation as an Iron Lady, one with Churchillian echoes, whose resolute leadership at a time of crisis helped make the Great Great Britain again after a decade or more of drift and decline,” wrote Steven Fielding, professor of political history at the University of Nottingham.

“Talking about the Ukraine crisis offering Johnson a ‘Falklands moment’ is simply gold for desperate Tories,” Fielding added. “It shows they are whistling in the dark in the face of dire poll numbers for the prime minister and his party.”

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Arizona GOP urges judge to end early voting; judge must rule on Monday | Arizona and Area News https://ballingertx.org/arizona-gop-urges-judge-to-end-early-voting-judge-must-rule-on-monday-arizona-and-area-news/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 19:45:00 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/arizona-gop-urges-judge-to-end-early-voting-judge-must-rule-on-monday-arizona-and-area-news/ Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services PHOENIX — Whether millions of Arizonans will lose the right to vote early could hinge on whether a judge finds the practice violates anyone’s right to a secret ballot. In a hearing on Friday, Arizona Republican Party lawyer Alexander Kolodin argued that letting people vote from home means others can […]]]>

Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services

PHOENIX — Whether millions of Arizonans will lose the right to vote early could hinge on whether a judge finds the practice violates anyone’s right to a secret ballot.

In a hearing on Friday, Arizona Republican Party lawyer Alexander Kolodin argued that letting people vote from home means others can see who they support.

This violates constitutional requirements that “the secrecy of the vote must be preserved”, he argued. He said door-to-door voting opens the door to pressure on people to vote a certain way or even sell their votes.

Attorney Daniel Arellano, who represents the Arizona Democratic Party, did not dispute that people who vote at home are free to share their choices with others, although it was pointed out that the Voter intimidation and vote selling are already illegal.

But Arellano said there was a big flaw in Republicans’ attempt to use the privacy issue against the state’s 1991 law allowing early voting without an excuse.

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“What they would have to allege and show is that early voting in each case would be unconstitutional because it would be impossible to vote early in private,” Arellano said.

“That’s just not the case,” he said. “People routinely vote early ballot privately all the time.”

A lawyer for Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, meanwhile, pointed out that the state’s GOP does not claim that the fact that some people can vote early prevents its own members from voting privately. In fact, state GOP chairwoman Kelli Ward, a plaintiff in the lawsuit, voted early in the 2020 election.

What’s happening here is the reverse of voting rights protection, said Hobbs’ attorney Roopali Desai. “Their demand is to make it harder to vote, to limit voting, to make it less people have the opportunity to vote,” she said.

Arellano told the judge, “‘No one is required to vote early,’ because Arizona is not one of those states where all ballots have to be mailed in. People remain free to go to the polls for whatever reason they want.

That now leaves the question whether Arizonans who like to vote early — they were nearly 3 million in the 2020 general election, about 88% of those who voted — will have that ability come November.

The judge, Mohave County Superior Court Judge Lee Jantzen, promised a decision on Monday.

Arizona has allowed some form of early voting for more than a century, encompassing everyone from the military and those not in the county on Election Day to people who are infirm or at least 65 years old. .

Republicans do not challenge these laws. Instead, what the party wants to repeal are laws in place since 1991 that allow anyone to request an early vote.

Reversing the law would do more than hurt the vast majority of Arizonans who like to vote by mail. There are also potential policy implications.

In the 2020 presidential race in Arizona, Republican Donald Trump edged out Democrat Joe Biden by nearly 124,000 votes among those who turned out to vote. But Biden won nearly 139,000 more votes among early voters than Trump.

During Friday’s arguments, Kolodin did not address the practice’s popularity or how it might affect future voter turnout. He urged the judge to focus on what could go wrong.

“The fundamental thing about mail-in voting is that it’s virtually impossible to catch bad actors,” he said.

Kolodin cited an example for Jantzen, the criminal charges brought against Guillermina Fuentes, a former mayor of San Luis, who agreed last week to plead guilty to gathering and, in some cases, filling out the ballots of others during the August 2020 primary election.

But Arellano noted during the hearing that the GOP’s legal attempt to kill virtually all early votes contains no real allegations of fraud in practice.

Attorney Karen Hartman-Tellez, who represents 13 of the state’s 15 counties, told Jantzen that before deciding whether or not to kill early voting, he needs to consider the effects it would have, especially if his order was to apply to this year’s general election.

She said counties spend a year or more finding polling places. If early voting isn’t an option, Hartman-Tellez said, that means scrambling to find not only many more sites that must meet Americans with Disabilities Act requirements — she thinks the need would be multiplied by six – but also finding more poll workers and election materials.

“Election officials are fantastic problem solvers,” she said. “But they are not magicians. They cannot create polling stations or electoral agents out of nothing.

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Revue Borgen – this antidote to real politics looks like The West Wing 2022 | Television https://ballingertx.org/revue-borgen-this-antidote-to-real-politics-looks-like-the-west-wing-2022-television/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/revue-borgen-this-antidote-to-real-politics-looks-like-the-west-wing-2022-television/ NOTnow we know why Donald Trump wanted to buy Greenland. In the Netflix premiere of Danish political drama Borgen – back with a fourth series after nearly a decade away – oil has been found on the world’s largest island. Fingers crossed, Denmark’s Arctic ambassador told a Foreign Office briefing, the field will be as […]]]>

NOTnow we know why Donald Trump wanted to buy Greenland. In the Netflix premiere of Danish political drama Borgen – back with a fourth series after nearly a decade away – oil has been found on the world’s largest island. Fingers crossed, Denmark’s Arctic ambassador told a Foreign Office briefing, the field will be as big and lucrative as Ekofisk. You remember Ekofisk: the oil field that was funded by Norway to secure the economic future of its citizens for generations when we Brits, sad face, did nothing so sensible with our income from the North Sea.

Just a second, you might just jump in. Could you tell us about the political status of Greenland? Sure. Greenland was a Danish colony from 1814 until 1953, when it became part of Denmark. Home rule was established in 1979 and she voted for new self-governing powers in 2008. That said, many of Greenland’s 56,000 people aspire to become independent and use any oil to fund this project. Aren’t you glad you asked?

Borgen is perhaps a near namesake of boring – and even I know the episode that dealt with political machinations over who should become Denmark’s next EU commissioner is an hour I’d better have spent on myself bathing in donkey’s milk with slices of cucumber on the eyes – but this opening episode whistles.

It cuts quickly and furiously between ministerial crises, the TV1 news channel’s audience problems and the personal and political problems of our heroine, Birgitte Nyborg, while making us rediscover my pale and masculine – if not still stale – models. , Søren Malling’s grumpy editor, Torben Friis, and Lars Mikkelsen’s economic sage, Søren Ravn.

Meet the Press…Nyborg as Foreign Secretary. Photo: Mike Kolloffel/Netflix

Back to the plot. A government bean counter calculates that if the Greenland oilfield produces 100 million barrels over a 30-year period, it would produce a revenue stream of $285 billion. That money would pay a lot of teachers, Finance Minister Helle Holst told a cabinet meeting. But wait: Denmark cannot participate in oil drilling, retorts our heroine, who is Minister of Foreign Affairs and therefore Copenhagen’s answer to Liz Truss. Despite all the other things going on in her life — hot flashes, a son dedicated to freeing the pig, the pregnancy of her ex’s new partner — she’s the most far-sighted member of the cabinet. Copenhagen, she points out, has signed the Paris Agreement and is committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2050.

True, says the pragmatic Helle, but it gives Denmark 28 years to exploit the new oil source without breaking that promise. It’s a remark that would make the veins in Greta Thunberg’s and George Monbiot’s forehead tingle so much that if these green energy sources could be hooked up to the national grid, we might not need oil to boil our kettles.

To what extent, asks this new Borgen series, should politicians remain true to their ideals? Should we sacrifice our principles on the altar of economic stability?

The questions become more delicate when we learn that the Russians have bought the Canadian stake in the company which drills for oil. Worse still, the head of this company is Putin’s buddy. Can the Danish government really condone such a project at a time when Western sanctions are being imposed on the Kremlin for invading Ukraine? If you answered yes, you are probably Sergei Lavrov.

A lot has changed since our last visit to Borgen in 2014. Scandi’s British love affair is over. No one accessorizes wellies with Faroe Isle sweaters anymore. I stopped answering my phone with a cheerful, “Saga Norén, Malmö CID.” Denmark has elected a second female prime minister, Mette Frederiksen. He had elected none when the show, about Nyborg’s rise to the top job, started.

As discussed, however, Nyborg’s career has taken a downward turn – yet she still wields power as part of a coalition led by Signe Kragh. Indeed, she is Nick Clegg for David Cameron, if Clegg and Cameron had been women and inspirational.

But if the future is female (the title of the first episode), there is no brotherly solidarity. Kragh finds out that Nyborg has turned everything on Dominic Cummings, inquiring against his boss due to the prime minister’s unconscionable pro-oil stance. “You’re alone on an ice floe,” Kragh scolds when she discovers what Nyborg has done behind her back. “Let’s hope it doesn’t melt under your feet.” That, boys and girls, is how to make a threat.

If, like me, you yearn for democratic politics to be conducted with Machiavellian sophistication and attention to political principle and detail – in other words, in a way contrary to Westminster practice – you will agree that it nice to see Borgen again. Like a 2022 version of The West Wing, it’s a fictional antidote to an unbearable reality.

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Russian central bank downplays the role of the dollar and the euro in the country and in the world https://ballingertx.org/russian-central-bank-downplays-the-role-of-the-dollar-and-the-euro-in-the-country-and-in-the-world/ Tue, 31 May 2022 13:22:00 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/russian-central-bank-downplays-the-role-of-the-dollar-and-the-euro-in-the-country-and-in-the-world/ The national flag flies over the headquarters of the Russian Central Bank in Moscow, Russia, May 27, 2022. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register May 31 (Reuters) – Russia’s central bank said on Tuesday the role of the dollar and euro as global currencies would decline as central banks rethink […]]]>

The national flag flies over the headquarters of the Russian Central Bank in Moscow, Russia, May 27, 2022. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

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May 31 (Reuters) – Russia’s central bank said on Tuesday the role of the dollar and euro as global currencies would decline as central banks rethink their strategies after the West froze Russian reserves, suggesting that may consider imposing negative rates for dollar and euro deposits.

Unprecedented Western sanctions froze about half of Russia’s gold and currency reserves, which stood at nearly $640 billion before Moscow began its military campaign in Ukraine on February 24.

The Bank of Russia said this precedent as well as discussions of a possible seizure of the frozen part of the reserves would cause other central banks, mainly in Asia and the Middle East, to rethink their savings strategies.

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“One would expect an increase in demand for gold and a decrease in the role of the US dollar and euro as reserve assets,” the bank said in a financial stability report.

At the end of 2021, the Russian central bank held $131.5 billion of its reserves in gold, while the rest of the $612.9 billion in reserves was held in foreign currency assets. As of May 20, Russia’s reserves have fallen to $583.4 billion.

The central bank said the share of foreign currency liabilities of Russian banks has recently declined as customers have stepped up withdrawals of funds from their foreign currency accounts, while the share of banks’ foreign currency assets has increased.

“One of the results of the restrictions imposed by the sanctions imposed on the foreign exchange market has been the tendency to increase the use of alternative currencies to the US dollar and the euro,” the central bank said, referring to the Chinese yuan. especially.

To speed up the process, Russia could consider imposing negative interest rates on deposits held in dollars and euros, the central bank said.

Central Bank Deputy Governor Ksenia Yudaeva later clarified that these discussions only concerned foreign currency deposits of corporate clients with banks, not those of retail clients.

Yudaeva said it was too early to lift the $10,000 limit on Russian citizens’ withdrawals from their foreign currency accounts, in place since the early days of the Ukraine campaign, but did not rule out revising it in september.

“We will wait for September and then we will see,” Yudaeva told reporters.

At the end of 2021, the share of foreign currency in household assets, including stocks and deposits, was around 22%, and the central bank at the time said it had no intention of reduce it.

The central bank also said in the report that Russian private investors have become the main driver of the stock market amid trade restrictions for non-residents.

($1 = 61.1000 rubles)

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Reuters reporting Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Tomasz Janowski

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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The man who killed Gandhi https://ballingertx.org/the-man-who-killed-gandhi/ Sun, 29 May 2022 05:48:16 +0000 https://ballingertx.org/the-man-who-killed-gandhi/ Comment Marina Salandy-Brown 37 minutes ago – Mahatma Gandhi is one of the best-known political figures of the last century. The man who killed him and shaped the course of Indian history is mostly unknown to us. Perhaps that’s why 1,160 people gathered at the National Theater in London last week on the opening night […]]]>

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Mahatma Gandhi is one of the best-known political figures of the last century. The man who killed him and shaped the course of Indian history is mostly unknown to us.

Perhaps that’s why 1,160 people gathered at the National Theater in London last week on the opening night of The Father and the Assassin to learn more about Nathuram Godse, his politics and the motive for his murderous action.

Judging by the standing ovation the actors received for their two-hour performance, the audience went home very happy with the, at times, amusing history lesson.

Gandhi was a touchstone for all colonized people because he dared to believe that the Indian people could rid themselves of the scourge of the British Empire. He showed how people could tap into their unrecognized power to create unfathomable change. He was a revolutionary in the truest sense of the word. He donned his famous capra to appeal to the masses whose sheer numbers were a force the British could not bear, even with their exploitative economy and politics, the use of extreme violence in reprisal and the repeated imprisonment of Gandhi.

The raj was the crown jewel of the Empire and was not to be handed over to the unwashed great, but the sun was beginning to set on the Empire and Gandhi did his part to hasten its demise with his teachings and protests massive.

The historical drama presented in a very modern way does not portray Gandhi’s life, since its main focus is his killer, nor does it present Gandhi as a perfect hero.

It should be noted that Gandhi was a lawyer who received his legal training in the UK. He was born in India in 1869, and after leaving the Inner Temple he lived for nearly two decades in South Africa, where he became interested in Indian rights and began to formulate his policy of protesting no violent.

Returning to India, he began to work for Hindu-Muslim autonomy, and in 1924 he became President of the Indian National Congress. Gandhi and his fellow lawyer-politicians in the Congress party, Nehru and Vallabhbhai Patel, argued for an independent India, with Hindus and Muslims living in a unified state.

Jinnah, who left the Congress party and, together with the Muslim League, began in the 1940s to call for a separate state for Muslims. Jinnah eventually became Pakistan’s first Governor-General.

The 1920s-40s were a time of great turmoil in India and although Gandhi’s non-violence movement inspired many, Muslim politicians were not his only opponents. In 1948, at the age of 78, Gandhi died violently, shot dead in the street at close range by a young Hindu nationalist.

Many iconic figures murdered in public appear to be the victims of deranged men acting alone. Gandhi’s Assassin fits this mold somewhat, although the play’s creator is anyone’s guess.

Outside the dramatic license, it is clear that Godse, born in 1910, had a strange childhood. His orthodox Brahmin parents superstitiously raised him as a girl until the age of 12 in order to protect him from an untimely death, which had befallen his older brothers. A modern identity crisis?

Possibly, but young Godse was also reputed to have a special connection with Goddess Gurka, as an oracle, and this won the family food and offerings, which were lost once he abandoned her feminine disguise, at least in the room. His powers left him and his specialness went with them. He had to make a living (as a tailor) and be an ordinary person.

At first, he followed Gandhi’s movement. but at the age of 19 he was radicalized by London-trained lawyer Vinayak Savarkar, who advocated violence to make India a Hindu-only home, in stark contrast to the non-violent and inclusive secularism of Gandhi. Godse joined two nationalist parties, agitating and distributing nationalist propaganda, and began to regard Gandhi as the person responsible not only for his own modest status, but also for the religious conflicts and other pressing issues of the time.

His opposing view of India’s future deepened and he later formed the Hindu Rashtra Dal, a shadowy militant group that reinforced his extreme nationalist beliefs. He was hanged for the murder of Gandhi, perhaps finding in this act a misplaced honor and smugness.

The British colonial policy of divide and rule was successful, whether in Guyana, Trinidad or India. Gandhi’s dream of an India in which Muslims and Hindus enjoyed equal rights and were one great free nation was always going to be difficult to achieve.

Its failure to prevent the creation of two separate states at independence is well documented. People today also live with the effects of his failure to prevent the hatred that fueled Hindu nationalism. Partition displaced 15 million people, thousands died and wars between India and Pakistan have continued for the past 74 years.

The play’s author, Anupama Chandrasekhar, suggests that 20th-century Indian politics and the brutal moral deviance of the British Empire have their parallels with today: Lord Mounbatten pursued a “hard Brexit” during the separation of India and Pakistan from British rule and each other in 1947, Godse remarks.

I imagine, alas, that no member of the current deviant British government was in the audience to feel embarrassed, at best, by the dangerous mess Brexit has made of Northern Ireland.

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